A Wivenhoe "landmark" the Cap Pilar

The Cap Pilar

John Collins (Nottage)

The Cap Pilar being towed to the West Quay before the intended repairs
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Adrian Seligman's barquentine Cap Pilar laid up at Wivenhoe
Nottage Maritime Institute
The burnt out remains of the Cap Pilar in Wivenhoe Dry Dock before it was filled in. This photo was taken by John Donnelly, a former crew member.
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Adrian Seligman’s yacht the Cap Pilar had been laid up at Wivenhoe during the war.  In 1939 she was at Brightlingsea for Aldous to carry out repairs and alterations, but this work was cancelled because of the outbreak of war and she was moved to make way for the new Naval base.

Built by G. Gautier at St. Malo in 1911 the Cap Pilar was a wood built barquentine of 279grt. She had been made famous as the subject of the book of the owner’s round the world cruise “The Voyage of the Cap Pilar”.

Acquired by the Palestine Maritime League in 1946, the Cap Pilar was to have been restored as a youth sail training ship in Wivenhoe dry dock, but money for the project was apparently not forthcoming and the decaying vessel was instead partly scrapped, the unsaleable material being burnt and the ashes left there.  It has been suggested that the vessel was in reality intended as a training ship for the embryo Israeli Navy and for this reason completion of the conversion was blocked by the Foreign Office until she was in any case too decayed for there to be any chance of her ever being made seaworthy.

However, before her final demise, she was an interesting sight on the Wivenhoe scene.  Rotten and dilapidated, with signs saying “DANGER KEEP OFF,” blocks and other bit falling down from time to time as the decayed rigging gave way, she nevertheless seemed like a ghost from the past to be gazed at with some sense of wonder.

See also Cap Pilar.

This page was added on 22/03/2015.

Comments about this page

  • Such a sad end to a lovely old vessel. I have read the book several times and every time I read it I find something different. I was born too late; I went to sea in 1966, trawling out of Lowestoft for 3 years and then went coasting for another 4 years and loved every day I was at sea.

    By mandy vicky rigley (28/05/2018)

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